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Haudenosaunee/Native American Studies Research Workshop

Comprised of Indigenous and non-Indigenous allied faculty and graduate student scholars from across disciplines at UB, The Haudenosaunee/Native American Studies Research Workshop provides a forum for discussion of recent academic work in the ever-emerging interdisciplinary field of Indigenous studies. The primary rationale for this research workshop’s Haudenosaunee-specific focus corresponds with maintaining respectful recognition of the University at Buffalo’s location within the traditional territories of the Haudenosaunee people.

Click here for the Haudenosaunee/Native American Studies Research Workshop events calendar.

Events

Spring 2016

Thursday, April 14
Location TBA
Jolene Rickard

Fall 2015

Wednesday, September 16, 6pm
1004 Clemens Hall
Planning Meeting

 

Friday, November 13
The 4th Annual Haudenosaunee Research Symposium
B45-Lower GAllery, CFA (North Campus)

 

Spring 2015

Wednesday, February 25, 7pm
112 Center for the Arts
Film Screening) Rhymes for Young Ghouls (2013)

This film, written and directed by Jeff Barnaby (Mi’gMaq), has been an official selection at numerous festivals across North American, including the Toronto International Film Festival. It won the Best First Feature Award at the Vancouver International Film Festival and the Tribeca Film Institute’s Creative Promise Award.

Synposis: Red Crow Mi’g Maq reservation, 1976: By government decree, every Indian child under the age of 16 must attend residential school. At 15, Aila is the weed princess of Red Crow. Hustling with her uncle, she sells enough dope to pay Popper, the sadistic Indian agent who runs the school, off. The precarious balance of Aila’s world is destroyed when her drug money is stolen. Her only options are to run or fight… and Mi’gMaq don’t run.

Discussion to follow

Saturday, April 18
Location TBA
Audra Simpson, Columbia University

Keynote Speech at 11th Annual Storytellers Conference

 

SPRING 2012

H-NA Reading Group Session #1: Friday, February 24 at 1-3:30 pm

Location:  1004 Clemens

Text:  Reclaiming Diné History: The Legacies of Navajo Chief Manuelito and Juanita (University of Arizona Press, 2007), by Jennifer Nez Denetdale.

Summary:  In preparation for Dr. Denetdale’s upcoming visit to UB, we will examine her groundbreaking book Reclaiming Diné History. As the great-great-great-granddaughter of the well -known Navajo chief Manuelito (1816-1894) and his nearly unknown wife Juanita (1845-1910), Dr. Denetdale began to explore her family history as a way of examining broader issues of Navajo historiography.  Her book is a thought-provoking examination of the construction of Diné history that underlines the dichotomy between Navajo and non-Navajo perspectives on the past.

Discussion of this text will be led by Steve Demchak  (AMS Graduate Student/NGA President )

H-NA Reading Group Session #2: Thursday, March 1 at 3-5:00pm

Location: 1004 Clemens

Text:  Peace, Power and Righteousness: An Indigenous Manifesto (Oxford, 1999; second edition 2009), by Taiaike Alfred

Summary:  In this visionary manifesto, first published in 1999, Taiaiake Alfred calls for the indigenous peoples of North America to move beyond their 500-year history of pain, loss, and colonization, and move forward to the reality of self-determination. His account of the history and future of the indigenous peoples of North America is at once a bold and forceful critique of Indigenous leaders and politics, and a sensitive reflection on the traumas of colonization that shape our existence. This new 2009 edition of Alfred’s important manifesto is thoroughly updated in the context of current issues related to government policy and First Nations politics today.

Discussion of this text will be led by Lou Williams (AMS Graduate Student)

Event: The Haudenosaunee-Native American Research Group is proud to co-sponsor The 8th Annual Indigenous and American Studies Storytellers Conference, UB North Campus, Clemens Hall, March 23 and 24th.

Featuring Keynote Speaker Dr. Jennifer Nez Denetdale (Navajo Nation)

John Mohawk Annual Keynote Address by Dr. Susan Hill (Six Nation’s Mohawk)

H-NA Film Screening Event #1: Friday, March 30 at 1-3pm

Location: 330 Student Union

Film:  To Brooklyn and Back : A Mohawk Journey, written and directed by Reaghan Tarbell

Summary: To Brooklyn and Back: A Mohawk Journey is an hour-long documentary about the personal story of Mohawk filmmaker Reaghan Tarbell from Kahnawake, Quebec as she explores her roots and traces the connections of her family to the Mohawk community in Brooklyn, New York. While the history of Mohawk ironworkers in the North Gowenus area of Brooklyn, known as Little Caughnawaga, has received attention in documentaries and publications, the stories of the Mohawk women who helped build and shape this community remain overlooked. This documentary highlights the contributions and stories of the Mohawk women who were instrumental in the creation of Little Caughnawaga.

Discussion of this film will be led by Theresa McCarthy (AMS Assistant Prof)

H-NA Film Screening Event #2: Monday, April 16 at 12:30-3:30 pm

Location: The Student Union Theatre

Film: Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner

Summary:  An enormous contribution to Indigenous filmmaking, the award-winning Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner directed by Zacharus Kunuk, is the first ever feature length film to be written,  produced, directed and acted entirely in the Inukitut language. Recognized as a cinematographic masterpiece, the film is an adaptation of one of the epic teachings in Inuit culture. An exciting action thriller set in ancient Igloolik, the film unfolds as a life-threatening struggle between powerful natural and supernatural characters. Atanarjuat gives international audiences a more authentic view of Inuit culture and oral tradition than ever before, from the inside and through Inuit eyes.  For countless generations, Igloolik elders have kept the legend of Atanarjuat alive to teach young Inuit the danger of setting personal desire above the needs of the group.

An associated reading for the film written by Seneca professor Michelle Raheja titled, “Visual Sovereignty, Indigenous Revisions of Ethnography and Atanarjuat (The Fast Runner)” will be placed on library reserve (AMS 000). This reading is a chapter from Dr. Raheja’s new book, Reservation Reelism: Redfacing, Visual Sovereignty, and Representations of Native Americans in Film (University of Nebraska, 2010).

ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO EVERYONE

If you would like to led a Reading Group Session, present your work at an H-NA forum or if you have suggestions for future events or questions about these upcoming events, please contact Theresa – tm59@buffalo.edu or Laticia –laticiam@buffalo.edu

FALL 2011

Monday, October 10, 7PM

Location: 120 Clemens Hall

Film Screening “Reel Injun”

Reel Injun is an entertaining and insightful look at the Hollywood Indian, exploring the portrayal of North American Natives through a century of cinema. Travelling through the heartland of America and into the Canadian North, Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond looks at how the myth of “the Injun” has influenced the world’s understanding – and misunderstanding – of Natives. With clips from hundreds of classic and recent films, and candid interviews with celebrated Native and non-Native directors, writers, actors, and activists including Clint Eastwood, Robbie Robertson, Graham Greene, Adam Beach, and Zacharias Kunuk, Reel Injun traces the evolution of cinema’s depiction of Native people from the silent film era to present day.”
 
Screening of the film will be followed by a panel discussion. Discussion of the film will be led by Aaron VanEvery (AMS Phd. Graduate Student) and a panel of Native American undergraduate and graduate students currently studying at UB.

SPRING 2011

Sadly, we acknowledge the passing of one of the co-founders of the Haudenosaunee-Native American Studies Research Group, Barry White. It is in memory of Barry, and in gratitude for all that he has done for us, that we dedicate the following Calendar of Events. Nya:weh Barry, we will miss you.

Reading Group Session #1: Monday, March 7th, 1-3pm.

Location: 1004 Clemens

Text:  Shadows at Dawn: A Borderlands Massacre and a History of Violence (Penguin Press, 2008), by Karl Jacoby.

Text Summary: From multiple vantage points, Karl Jacoby, Professor of History at Brown University, re-examines the notoriously brutal Camp Grant Massacre of over 50 unarmed Apache – mainly women and children – in 1871, Arizona.

Discussion of this text will be led by Carole Emberton (Assistant Professor, History)

Event: The Haudenosaunee-Native American Research Group is proud to co-sponsor The 7th Annual Indigenous and American Studies Storytellers Conference, UB North Campus, Clemens Hall, March 25 and 26th.

Featuring Keynote Speaker Dr. Jose Barreiro (Taino Nation of the Antilles)

John Mohawk Annual Keynote Address by Dr. Kevin White (Akwesasne Mohawk)

Reading Group Session #2: Wednesday, April 6th, 2-4pm

Location:  734 Clemens

Text:  Thinking In Indian:  A John Mohawk Reader (Fulcrum, 2010), edited by Jose Barriero

Text Summary:  An edited collection of the writings of Seneca teacher-scholar-activist John Mohawk over the course of several decades.  Anchored in Haudenosaunee intellectual traditions, John provides a distinctly Indigenous analysis of a broad range of topics including sovereignty, modern existence, land and treaty rights, cultural revival and globalization.

Discussion of this text will be led by Laticia McNaughton (AMS  Graduate Student/H-NA Coordinator)

Reading Group Session #3: Wednesday, April 20 at 2-4pm

Location: 734 Clemens

For this session we welcome guest speaker Scott Lauria Morgensen, Assistant Professor in the Gender Studies Department at Queens University in Ontario. Scott situates his scholarship within a politics of alliance with the activist work of Native intellectuals in the academy and in various community-based social justice movements. His interdisciplinary research interests bridge the fields of Indigenous, settler colonial, critical race, feminist and queer studies, while being informed by and addressing American studies, anthropology, and global studies.   Scott’s monograph “Spaces between Us: Queer Settler Colonialism and Indigenous Decolonization” will appear on the fall 2011 list of the University of Minnesota Press.

Morgensen Readings:

Settler Homonationalism: Theorizing Settler Colonialism within Queer Modernities. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, Volume 16, Number 1-2, 2010, pp. 105-131

The Biopolitics of Settler Colonialism, forthcoming in the March 2011 inaugural issue of Settler Colonial Studies. (to be distributed )

Documentary Film Screening:  Reel Injuns: On the Trail of the Hollywood Indian

Date/Time/Location: TBA – last week in April

Reel Injun is an entertaining and insightful look at the Hollywood Indian, exploring the portrayal of North American Natives through a century of cinema. Travelling through the heartland of America and into the Canadian North, Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond looks at how the myth of “the Injun” has influenced the world’s understanding – and misunderstanding – of Natives. With clips from hundreds of classic and recent films, and candid interviews with celebrated Native and non-Native directors, writers, actors, and activists including Clint Eastwood, Robbie Robertson, Graham Greene, Adam Beach, and Zacharias Kunuk, Reel Injun traces the evolution of cinema’s depiction of Native people from the silent film era to present day.”

Discussion of the film will be led by a panel of Native American undergraduate and graduate students currently studying at UB.

EVERYONE IS WELCOME: If you have any questions about these upcoming events, please contact Theresa – tm59@buffalo.edu or Laticia –laticiam@buffalo.edu

FALL 2009

Susan M. Hill (Department of Indigenous Studies and Contemporary Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University, Brantford)

September 30, 2009 | “Yohyatonhiyo––’It Is Written Well’: The Challenges of Writing Haudenosaunee History that meets Community and Academic Standards”

“Thinking Beyond the Nation-State: A Symposium on Empires, Diasporas and Indigeneity”

November 20, 2009 | Featured Commentators: Richard W. Hill (Associate Director, First Nations Technical Institute); Rinaldo Walcott (Canada Research Chair, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto)

Tracey Deer (Kahnawake Mohawk) and Shelley Niro (Grand River Mohawk)

February 25, 2010 | Screenings of Club Native (2008: dir. Deer) and The Shirt (2003: dir. Niro)

Reading Group: Sophia Azeb (Department of American Studies, UB)

March 22, 2010 | Azeb leads the discussion of Noenoe K. Silva’s Aloha Betrayed: Native Hawaiian Resistance to American Colonialism (2004)

Reading Group: Erik Seeman (Department of History, UB)

March 29, 2010 | Seeman leads the discussion of Ned Blackhawk’s Violence Over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West (2006)

Reading Group: Rick Monture (Acting Director of Indigenous Studies at McMaster University)

April 12, 2010 | Monture leads the discussion of Daniel Heath Justice’s Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History (2006)