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October 2020

Science Studies Research Workshop: Lourdes Vera, “Environmental Data Justice: Developing Civically Valid Air Monitoring Methods with Oil and Gas Fenceline Communities”

October 29 @ 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Zoom

Environmental Data Justice: Developing Civically Valid Air Monitoring Methods with Oil and Gas Fenceline Communities Speaker: Lourdes Vera, Northeastern University Presented by: The Humanities Institute Science Studies Workshop CLICK HERE to register This is the story of how a group of residents, community organizers, and I learned to monitor the air for hazardous chemicals at homes neighboring oil and gas facilities in Karnes County, TX. Residents reported a number of problems: including dead livestock, rotten egg smells, nosebleeds, and respiratory…

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November 2020

Alex Escaja, in discussion with Kari Winter, about “Looking Back at Me”

November 3 @ 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm
Online

Vote and celebrate Election Day! Join Professor Kari J. Winter (Global Gender & Sexuality Studies) for a discussion with Alex Escaja, who was recently recognized by GLAAD (Teen Vogue, June 2020) as one of the "20 under 20: Young LGBTQ People Shaping the Future of Media and Activism." He will be discussing his award-winning documentary short, "Looking Back at Me," and issues of LGBTQ representation in media. To register, email Prof. Kari Winter.

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Digital Humanities Research Workshop: Averill Earls and Sarah Handley-Cousins, “Podcasting as Digital Public History”

November 9 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Zoom

In this talk, Averill and Sarah will discuss their podcast project, Dig: A History Podcast, ​a collaborative project that strives to bring the best and most important conversations happening among history scholars to the broadest possible audience​. They will also discuss strategies for using podcasting in the classroom. To register, please visit: https://booking.lib.buffalo.edu/event/7215957

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Science Studies Research Workshop: Samuel K. Roberts, “Persistent Plagues: Race, Space, and Epidemiological Thinking in Illicit Drug Use Research, 1950-1980”

November 12 @ 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Zoom

REGISTER HERE Please register by November 1. {zoom link will be sent after registration} Please join us Nov. 12 for Dr. Samuel K. Roberts’ inaugural keynote address for UB’s new series Race, Health, and Science. Dr. Samuel K. Roberts is Associate Professor of History and African-American Studies (Columbia University School of Arts & Sciences) and Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences (Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health) Presented by the Humanities Institute Science Studies Workshop, with generous support from UB’s…

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[Virtual] Scholars@Hallwalls: Randy Schiff, “Catastrophic Companionship: General Systems Theory, the General Prologue, and the Collapsing Canterbury Tales”

November 13 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zoom,

REGISTER TO ATTEND Join us for a virtual edition of our Faculty Fellows talks! This lecture series brings current UB humanities research out into the community. Exploring general systems theory, Randy argues that Canterbury Tales criticism both benefits from, and enriches, environmental studies.  Showing that Chaucer thinks systematically in fashioning his tale-telling contest, Randy compares his pilgrimage with sub-network interaction within an ecosystem. “Quiting”—the pilgrimage’s retaliatory economic principle—creates overexciting energy that dooms the company to collapse. Studying such a vibrant,…

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Digital Humanities Research Workshop: Averill Earls, “Digital Storytelling in the Classroom”

November 16 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Zoom

Averill Earls, assistant professor of History and Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at Mercyhurst University will lead an interactive discussion on tools and methods for teaching digital storytelling in undergraduate classes. To register, visit: https://booking.lib.buffalo.edu/event/7215976  

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Technoculture Research Workshop: Andrew Lison, “Convolutional Neural Networks, AI, and the Physical Limits of Computing”

November 19 @ 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Online

CLICK HERE to RSVP It is commonly held that recent advances in “artificial intelligence” have largely been possible due to recent increases in computing power. Moreover, it has long been an engineering assumption, emblematized by Gordon E. Moore's “law,” that this power will continue to improve over time. This talk interrogates the first assumption by way of the increasing untenability of the second: rather than a resurgence enabled by improvements in computation, the recent prominence of AI, it argues, is…

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SAVE-THE-DATE: Black Utopias in a Post-Pandemic World

November 19 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Zoom,

There is a powerful tradition of utopian practice and thought in African American communities. From black towns like Mound Bayou, Mississippi to the lyrical imaginings of Afrofuturism Black utopias have been a potent response to racial inequality and suffering. At this moment of rupture, with the related crises of the pandemic, racial uprisings, climate change and economic decline, Black Utopian thought and practice offer alternative paths to the future. On Thursday, November 19 leading scholars and artists in the field…

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December 2020

[Virtual] Scholars@Hallwalls: Ewa Ziarek, “A Crisis of Narrative and Judgement in the Age of Big Data”

December 4 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zoom,

REGISTER TO ATTEND Join us for a virtual edition of our Faculty Fellows talks! This lecture series brings current UB humanities research out into the community. This talk rethinks the stakes of Arendt’s notion of narrative in the context of the new regime of power characteristic of Big Data. Intertwined with judgement and public sphere, narrative, according to Arendt, can be a political form of acting in the world, which facilitates a public mode of debate with others. Yet, can…

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February 2021

[Virtual] Scholars@Hallwalls: Millie Chen, “Silk Road Songbook: Notes on Making Art Under Censorship and Globalization”

February 5, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zoom,

Where there is limited freedom of expression, how can one creatively and collectively mourn, remember, persist, and declare? Songs have the capacity to turn sorrow and outrage into fortitude and optimism. Silk Road Songbook is a socially driven, multidisciplinary art project that weaves song into landscape, challenging censorship and Orientalist exoticism. Grass roots songs channeling local voices concerning land, sovereignty, and cultural identity are created in collaboration with artists in communities along an ancient trade route spanning Eurasia between Xi’an…

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