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October 2020

Haundenosaunee/Native American Studies Research Group: A Conversation on Hodinöhsö:ni′ Geographies: Unsettling the Settler State.

October 1 @ 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm
Zoom

Please join us on October 1, 2020. 4:00-5:15 pm EST for an informal discussion, A Conversation on Hodinöhsö:ni′ Geographies: Unsettling the Settler State. This first of three conversations will revolve around a place-based discussion on meaningful acknowledgements in Hodinöhsö:ni′ traditional territories. How might we use land introductions to follow through with a responsibility and commitment to nurturing healthy communities? How is the research and teaching in land grant institutions often in tension with Hodinöhsö:ni′ concepts of land and sovereignty? What…

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Alison L. Des Forges International Symposium: “Human Rights at Risk: Popular Uprisings and Regime Change”

October 15 @ 9:00 am - 2:30 pm
Online

In the past year, we have witnessed popular uprisings that have led to changes in governments in Algeria, Sudan, and Puerto Rico. At the same time, the United States has used various methods to encourage or force regime change in Iran, Syria, and Venezuela. Internal popular uprisings are often undertaken on pretexts of defending or extending human rights, but they can sometimes result in abuses of human rights. And calls for regime change in the name of “democracy” and “human…

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Mishuana Goeman presentation, “Electric Lights, Tourist Sights: Gendering Dispossession and Settler Colonial Infrastructure at Niagara Falls”

October 15 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Zoom

Please join the University at Buffalo Gender Institute and Center for Diversity Innovation for an exciting lecture from the 2020-2021 Distinguished Visiting Scholar Mishuana Goeman. The lecture, entitled "Electric Lights, Tourist Sights: Gendering Dispossession and Settler Colonial Infrastructure at Niagara Falls," will take place via Zoom on October 15, 2020 at 4 p.m. (EDT). Please register for your free ticket in order to receive the link in advance of the program: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mishuana-goeman-lecture-electric-lights-tourist-sights-tickets-121606619673 For more information, please see the attached flyer…

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[Virtual] Scholars@Hallwalls: Tamara Thornton, “Globes and the Global Imagination in Early America: Objects, ideas, and People”

October 23 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zoom,

Join us for a virtual edition of our Faculty Fellows talks! This lecture series brings current UB humanities research out into the community. We live in an age of global communities and economies, but when and how did Americans begin to think globally? Thornton turns to globes themselves, exploring a long-lost world when globes were rare, came in celestial and terrestrial pairs, and were used not as spherical maps, but to calculate how the experience of seasons, sunlight and darkness,…

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November 2020

[Virtual] Scholars@Hallwalls: Randy Schiff, “Catastrophic Companionship: General Systems Theory, the General Prologue, and the Collapsing Canterbury Tales”

November 13 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Zoom,

Exploring general systems theory, Randy argues that Canterbury Tales criticism both benefits from, and enriches, environmental studies.  Showing that Chaucer thinks systematically in fashioning his tale-telling contest, Randy compares his pilgrimage with sub-network interaction within an ecosystem. “Quiting”—the pilgrimage’s retaliatory economic principle—creates overexciting energy that dooms the company to collapse. Studying such a vibrant, but unsustainable system helps us recognize our own social systems’ destructive feedback loops. Randy Schiff researches Middle English literature and culture, with special interests in romance,…

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SAVE-THE-DATE: Black Utopias in a Post-Pandemic World

November 19 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Zoom,

There is a powerful tradition of utopian practice and thought in African American communities. From black towns like Mound Bayou, Mississippi to the lyrical imaginings of Afrofuturism Black utopias have been a potent response to racial inequality and suffering. At this moment of rupture, with the related crises of the pandemic, racial uprisings, climate change and economic decline, Black Utopian thought and practice offer alternative paths to the future. On Thursday, November 19 leading scholars and artists in the field…

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